Specimen No.5 Notation on back reads: 'Fata Acereceae Acer saccharinum; Male Sugar Maple Fairy collected late fall of 1929 near the Miskatonic University. Notice, even in death the wings still do not cast any shadows.'
Specimen No.5
Notation on back reads: “Fata Acereceae Acer saccharinum; Male Sugar Maple Fairy collected late fall of 1929 near the Miskatonic University. Notice, even in death the wings still do not cast any shadows.”
Specimen No.36 Notation on back reads: 'Fata Danaus plexippus; the Monarch Fairy collected in late spring of 1932 along the banks of Lake Boeuf.'
Specimen No.36
Notation on back reads: “Fata Danaus plexippus; the Monarch Fairy collected in late spring of 1932 along the banks of Lake Boeuf.”

‘Colonel Lou’s Compendium of the Fata’

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From ‘Colonel Lou’s Compendium of the Fata’ these are his field guide notes on the Fata.

“Fata Aceraceae”
“Fata Aceraceae Acer rubrum”
(red)
“Fata Acereceae Acer saccharinum” (sugar)
Specimen No.5 from the Fata collection of Aloisius “Lou” Cyffer 1893-1948
Notation on back reads: “Fata Acereceae Acer saccharinum; Male Sugar Maple Fairy collected late fall of 1929 near the Miskatonic University. Notice, even in death the wings still do not cast any shadows.”

common names: “Maple Fay, Red Maple Fairies, or Sugar Maple Fairies”
Like other creatures of the natural world, the males or brightly colored while the female are almost colorless.
Seen near maple trees from mid September until the first snow or hard frost. In years with Indian Summers they are extremely easy to find at that time!

The wings of these creatures seem to serve no other purposes than that of camouflage. The wings do not move, nor do they cast any shadows. The creatures themselves tend to float and bob in the air as if they existed upon the surface of a pond.
Many times I have watched their mating dance. The female poses herself in what could only be called shy little girl poses, while the male spins and twirlers around her. He does this by spinning in a counter clockwise direction, while circumnavigating around her in a clockwise direction. If he can achieve three rotations around her, without her darting away, she allows him to embrace her, and the two plunge headlong into the ground at a surprising speed.

The females of both the Fata Aceraceae Acer rubrum, and Fata Acereceae Acer saccharinum look almost identical. They also seem to out number the males by a minimum of five to one.

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“Fata Danaus plexippus”
Specimen No.36 from the Fata collection of Aloisius “Lou” Cyffer 1893-1948
Notation on back reads: “Fata Danaus plexippus; the Monarch Fairy collected in late spring of 1932 along the banks of Lake Boeuf.”

common name: “Monarch Fairies”
This creature looks very much like its’ name sake but can be spotted by the trained observer by the long graceful antenna like extensions off of the wings. These are only noticeable when the creature is in a hovering state.
Most often found tending flowers near medium size bodies of slow moving water. I have often spotted them in late spring and early summer near Lake Boeuf. Most delightful creatures!
Monarch Fairies also seem to have keen eyesight, as you must sit almost stonelike for sometimes up to three hours before they will return to an area after they have spotted your movement.
wing size is 50% greater than a Monarch butterfly!

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Specimen No.1 Curators note on back reads: 'Fata Belleau Wood; this unidentified Fairy creature was found at the Battle of Belleau Wood.'
Specimen No.1

Specimen No.1 from the Fata collection of Aloisius “Lou” Cyffer 1893-1948
Curators note on back reads: “Fata Belleau Wood; this unidentified Fairy creature was found at the Battle of Belleau Wood near the Marne River in France.”

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“Fata Belua paluster”
common name: Swamp Troll or Bayou Troll
What little I have learned of these creatures, they are gentle and peaceful. Living in the shallow muddy banks of the bayou, they are rarely seen and seem to only move about at night. They have a highly developed scene of smell and hearing, but seem to be almost blind, except when the moon is near full. It is unclear what their function is in the natural world. They are often blamed for torn fishing nets, and broken traps.

I found this one in the Bayou Courtableau. By shining a bright light on it, he remained almost motionless long enough for me to paint this image.

It seems that the plants grow from their bodies. The older ones have a greater deal of moss covering their back and limbs.

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Aloisius “Lou” Cyffer April 23, 1893 – November 1, 1948 (Lt. Col. USMC Retired)
“Battle of Belleau Wood, 6–26 June 1918”

Aloisius “Lou” Cyffer, Lt. Col. USMC Retired
Known to his friends and colleagues as Colonel Lou, was born the 23rd of April 1893 near Kreamer, LA and died the 1st ofNovember 1948 in New Orleans.
Not very much is known of the early life of Colonel Lou. It is known that in WWI he was in the Battle of Belleau Wood, where he survived a head wound. It is believed that it was the damage caused by this wound that enabled Colonel Lou to see the creatures of the faerie world. After his retirement (date unknown) from the Marine Corps, he spent some time at the Miskatonic University with Professor Dexter and Professor Lake before returning to his family estate near New Orleans where he continued with his research, taking field trips all over the world until his strange and untimely death.

‘Colonel Lou’s Compendium of the Fata’ copyright Parker Torrence 2010